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Newspaper Archive of
Pahrump Mirror
Pahrump, Nevada
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October 23, 1997     Pahrump Mirror
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October 23, 1997
 

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Food, Health and Fitness Pahrump Valley Gazette, Thursday, Oetoher 23, 1997 13 'The average incu- bation period for localized genital in- fection is three to seven days.' Giving summer favorites a fall make-over Let the change of season begin in your kitchen by giving favorite summer food a new look - and taste - for fall. Many summer staples are easily transformed into hearty yet healthy dishes when you warm them up with autumn flavors. Take baked beans. This backyard barbecue favorite comes complete with seasonings like molasses, brown sugar and garlic, making it an excellent base for crowd- pleasing soups and stews during the colder seasons. Or take popular cool summer salad ingredients, like garbanzo beans and tomatoes, heat them up and combine them with spices and other ingredients to create hearty fall meals. From summer to fall, beans are a no-fuss way to add vitamins and protein, without lots of fat or calories; and they're easy to prepare. If you plan your meals ahead, use, dry packaged beans. They're simply to soak and cook. Or keep canned beans on hand for added convenience and spur-of-the-moment cooking. Try these two recil which combine the best of both seasons. Canned baked beans are an easy and tasty stew- starter for Baked Bean Stew, a zesty meal with chicken, garbanzo beans and tomatoes. Autumn Chicken & Bean Bonanza combines summery garbanzo beans, tomatoes sand sun-dried raisins with warm fall spices like cinnamon and cumin. For additional recipes, visit our Web site at http://www.praifieweb.com/bean. Baked Bean Stew 1 cup chopped onion 1 cup chopped green pepper 1 tablespoon vegetable oil 12 ounces boneless skinless chicken breast or tenders, cut into l/2-inch pieces 2 cans (30 oz.) baked beans or pork and beans 1 can(15oz.) garbanzo beans or blackeyes, drained and rinsed; or 1 1/2 cups cooked dry packaged garbanzo beans or blackeyes 1 can (14.5 oz) diced tomatoes with roasted gar- lic, undrained 3/4 teaspoon dried sage leaves 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin Salt and pepper, to taste Saute onion and green pepper in oil in large saucepan until tender, three to four minutes. Add chicken and cook over medium heat until browned, three to four minutes. Add beans, tomatoes, and herbs to saucepan; heat to boiling. Reduce heat and simmer, uncovered, eight to ten minutes. Season to taste with salt and pepper. TIPS: Frozen chopped onion and green pepper can he used. Stew can he prepared one to two days in advance; refrigerate, covered. Stew can also he frozen up to two months. Chicken and Bean Bonanza 1 1/2 cups chopped onion 1/2 cup chopped green or red pepper 1 teaspoon minced garlic 1 tablespoon vegetable oil 12 ounces boneless skinless chicken breast or tenders, cut into l/2-inch pieces 1 teaspoon ground cumin 3/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1 can (15 oz.) navybeansorgarbanzobeans, drained and rinsed; or 1 1/2 cups cooked dry packaged navy beans or garbanzo beans 1 can (15 oz.) red beans or kidney beans, drained and rinsed; or 1 1/2 cups cooked dry packaged red beans or kidney beans l can (14.5 oz.) Italian-Style stewed tomatoes, undrained 1/4 cup raisins Salt and pepper, to taste Saute onion, pepper, and garlic in oil in medium saucepan two to three minutes. Add chicken, cumin, and cinnamon; cook over medium-high heat until chicken is lightly browned, three to four minutes. Add beans, tomatoes and raisins; heat to boiling. Reduce heat and simmer, uncovered, until slightly thickened, five to eight minutes. Season to taste with salt and pepper. TIPS: Frozen chopped onion and green pepper, and prepared garlic can be used. The dish is delicious served over cooked rice, couscous, or pasta. Can he prepared one to two days in advance; refrigerate, covered. Tips and techniques to prepare dry beans For cooks looking for do-ahead convenience, dry beans are easy to prepare. The Bean Education and Awareness Network (B.E.A.N.) offers the following tips for preparing dry packaged beans. Before cooking, soak dry packaged beans to help soften and return moisture to the beans and reduce cooking time. Most beans will rehydrate to triple their dry size, so be sure to start with a large enough pot. * Preferred Hot soak and Quick soak methods - Hot soaking helps dissolve some of the gas-causing sub- stances, making the beans easier to digest. For each pound of beans, add 10 cups hot water; heat to boiling and let boil two to three minutes. Remove from heat, cover and set aside for at least one hour (Quick Soak), or up to four hours (Hot Soak). * Traditional Overnight Soak - For each pound (two cups) dry packaged beans, add 10 cups cold water and let soak overnight, or at least eight hours. Bean Cooking * Drain soaking water and rinse beans; cook in fresh water. In general, beans take 30 minutes to two hours to cook depending on variety. Check bean packaging for specific cooking times and instructions. * Spice up beans while they cook. Seasonings, such as garlic, onion, oregano, parsley or thyme can be added to the pot while beans are cooking. Add acidic ingredients, such as tomatoes, vinegar, wine or citrus juices, only at end of cooking, when the beans are tender. * To test for doneness, bite-taste a few beans. They should be tender, but not overcooked. When cooling, keep beans in cooking liquid to prevent them fro m drying out. Bean Storing Cooked dry beans can be stored in air-tight containers in the freezer for up to six months. Bean dishes can be stored about four or five days in refrigerator. Bean Counting * One pound dry packaged beans (uncooked) = about two cups dry = six cups cooked,drained * One cup dry packaged beans (uncooked) = three cups cooked = about two cans (15 112 ounces each), drained